Editorial

Each day we see, hear and read about the toll taken by drivers who are distracted or fatigued, who have been drinking and who speed or engage in other risky behaviours while behind the wheel.

Various campaigns and programmes have been launched over the years to address these concerns, and government agencies, industries and professional organisations have long focused on ways to improve road safety.

There have been comments about the hazard of driving and the need for better controls, such as the one on -‘The electronic driver’. The comment on the safety of mechanical equipment and the method of control of autos predict development to come.

An approach that one should suggest is a result of recent technological advances in the field of electronics. Electronics equipment is already being applied to the control of aircraft. It may be feasible to apply such control to automotive travel.

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In reviewing the functions which the drivers must perform, it is obvious that he might be further assisted… by supplying him limited aids for perceiving the situation, thereby simplifying his decisions or reducing his motor effort. We should allude to intelligent vehicle/highway systems and their potential to reduce driver’s error.

Safety mechanism helps keep drivers awake, a device developed to alert sleepy drivers. The inattentive, fatigued sleepy motorists are becoming an increasingly dangerous menace on the public highway. Since there was no way to control the number of hours individuals operate their cars each day, the solution must rely upon science and the development of a simple and effective method or device that will curtail and better yet prevent highway accident due to sleepiness, inattention or driver fatigue.

The need for improved road safety has taken centre stage internationally as well. The UN general assembly had proclaimed the UN decade of action. The action campaign focuses on delivering education and sharing knowledge, creating local expertise, building safer roads and vehicle, mobilising international support, and gathering better data.

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